THE SAYINGS OF PUBLILIUS SYRUS (Part 7)

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This is part seven in our series of aphorisms by Publilius Syrus who was a big influence on Seneca and his own work. He is quoted by Seneca in two of his letters to Lucilius, On the Value of Advice and On the Philosopher’s Seclusion, both coming from his Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium, known today as the Letters from a Stoic.  

If you have read Seneca’s work before, carefully study how the Syrus aphorisms have influenced him. 

Regardless of whether they have a Stoic context or not, they are nonetheless enjoyable. 

My favorite aphorisms are in bold.

The quotes are attributable to the D. Lyman translation.

To see other parts of this series, click here.


PUBLILIUS SYRUS #61
Keep a sharp watch where you would not lose.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #62
Excessive severity misses its own aim. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #63
Audacity augments courage; hesitation, fear. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #64
If you can not become a harper, become a piper. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #65
When Gold argues the cause, eloquence is impotent. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #66
Woman loves or hates: she knows no middle course.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #67
Concert of action renders slight aid efficient.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #68
What greater evil could you wish a miser, than long life?

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #69
You can easily get the better of Avarice, if you are not avaricious yourself.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #70
Money does not sate Avarice, but stimulates it. 

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