Category Archives: The Sayings of Publilius Syrus

THE SAYINGS OF PUBLILIUS SYRUS (PART 19)

This is part 19 in our series of aphorisms by Publilius Syrus who was a big influence on Seneca and his own work. He is quoted by Seneca in two of his letters to Lucilius, On the Value of Advice and On the Philosopher’s Seclusion, both coming from his Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium, known today as the Letters from a Stoic.  

If you have read Seneca’s work before, carefully study how the Syrus aphorisms have influenced him. 

Regardless of whether they have a Stoic context or not, they are nonetheless enjoyable. 

My favorite aphorisms are in bold.

The quotes are attributable to the D. Lyman translation.

To see other parts of this series, click here.


PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 181
It is enough to think ill of an enemy, without speaking it.


PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 182
You can find more friends at the tenth hour, than at the first.


PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 183
A homely woman is one of the most comely of apes.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 184
Wisdom is acquired by meditation.


PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 185
While we stop to think, we often miss our opportunity.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 186
Deliberation should be protracted, when the decision is to be final.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 187
When utility is our aim, a little delay is advisable.


PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 188
It is madness to put confidence in error.


PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 189
When Providence favors, you can make a safe voyage on a twig. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 190
The gods methinks must laugh when a prosperous man puts up a prayer [for more]. 

WANT MORE?

We’ve enlisted the help of Marcus Aurelius, Epictetus, and Seneca to assist us in providing even more additional guidance to help you live your most virtuous life. Want to see what wisdom they have to provide? Complete the form below and join our private monthly newsletter. Oh, and did we mention there’s also free goodies for signing up?

THE SAYINGS OF PUBLILIUS SYRUS (Part 18)

This is part 18 in our series of aphorisms by Publilius Syrus who was a big influence on Seneca and his own work. He is quoted by Seneca in two of his letters to Lucilius, On the Value of Advice and On the Philosopher’s Seclusion, both coming from his Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium, known today as the Letters from a Stoic.  

If you have read Seneca’s work before, carefully study how the Syrus aphorisms have influenced him. 

Regardless of whether they have a Stoic context or not, they are nonetheless enjoyable. 

My favorite aphorisms are in bold.

The quotes are attributable to the D. Lyman translation.

To see other parts of this series, click here.


PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 171
What happens to one man may happen to all. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 172
When the people detest a man’s life, they call for his death. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 173
The greatest of comforts is to be free from blame. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 174
There is no safety in regaining the favor of an enemy. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 175
Anger and inordinate desire are the worst of counselors. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 176
To refuse when extreme necessity prays, is to condemn to death. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 177
The tongue of the condemned can speak, but cannot avert the doom. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 178
The gain acquired at the expense of reputation, should be counted a loss.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 179
There is rarely a loss where plenty is unknown. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 180
The blessing which could be received, can be taken away.

WANT MORE?

We’ve enlisted the help of Marcus Aurelius, Epictetus, and Seneca to assist us in providing even more additional guidance to help you live your most virtuous life. Want to see what wisdom they have to provide? Complete the form below and join our private monthly newsletter. Oh, and did we mention there’s also free goodies for signing up?

THE SAYINGS OF PUBLILIUS SYRUS (Part 17)

This is part 17 in our series of aphorisms by Publilius Syrus who was a big influence on Seneca and his own work. He is quoted by Seneca in two of his letters to Lucilius, On the Value of Advice and On the Philosopher’s Seclusion, both coming from his Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium, known today as the Letters from a Stoic.  

If you have read Seneca’s work before, carefully study how the Syrus aphorisms have influenced him. 

Regardless of whether they have a Stoic context or not, they are nonetheless enjoyable. 

My favorite aphorisms are in bold.

The quotes are attributable to the D. Lyman translation.

To see other parts of this series, click here.


PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 161
Reproach in misfortune is an unseasonable cruelty. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 162
It is barbarity, not courage, that can slay babes. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 163
Tears gratify a savage nature, they do not melt it. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 164
Anger blazes forth but once against its object. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 165
He who has no home, is a dead man without a sepulcher. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 166
He whom the popular voice approves, holds the key of the people’s treasure. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 167
He who can get more than belongs to him, is apt to accommodate his desires to his opportunity. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 168
To be always giving, is to encourage a forcible taking when one refuse to give. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 169
Every man is a master in his own calling. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS # 170
Patience is a remedy for every sorrow.

WANT MORE?

We’ve enlisted the help of Marcus Aurelius, Epictetus, and Seneca to assist us in providing even more additional guidance to help you live your most virtuous life. Want to see what wisdom they have to provide? Complete the form below and join our private monthly newsletter. Oh, and did we mention there’s also free goodies for signing up?


THE SAYINGS OF PUBLILIUS SYRUS (Part 16)

This is part 16 in our series of aphorisms by Publilius Syrus who was a big influence on Seneca and his own work. He is quoted by Seneca in two of his letters to Lucilius, On the Value of Advice and On the Philosopher’s Seclusion, both coming from his Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium, known today as the Letters from a Stoic.  

If you have read Seneca’s work before, carefully study how the Syrus aphorisms have influenced him. 

Regardless of whether they have a Stoic context or not, they are nonetheless enjoyable. 

My favorite aphorisms are in bold.

The quotes are attributable to the D. Lyman translation.

To see other parts of this series, click here.


PUBLILIUS SYRUS #151
Man’s most prudent counselor is time.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #152
Wisdom had rather be buffeted than not be listened to.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #153
Folly had rather be unheard than be buffeted. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #154
It is hard to touch that which brings pain by mere contact. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #155
A god can hardly disturb a man truly happy.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #156
Have courage, or cunning, when you deal with an enemy. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #157
It is folly to be too frank with impudent familiarity. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #158
Let fly many arrows, and no two will hit in the same place. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #159
He who longs for death, confesses that life is a failure. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #160
The sick man’s intemperance makes the physician relentless.

WANT MORE?

We’ve enlisted the help of Marcus Aurelius, Epictetus, and Seneca to assist us in providing even more additional guidance to help you live your most virtuous life. Want to see what wisdom they have to provide? Complete the form below and join our private monthly newsletter. Oh, and did we mention there’s also free goodies for signing up?

THE SAYINGS OF PUBLILIUS SYRUS (Part 15)

This is part 15 in our series of aphorisms by Publilius Syrus who was a big influence on Seneca and his own work. He is quoted by Seneca in two of his letters to Lucilius, On the Value of Advice and On the Philosopher’s Seclusion, both coming from his Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium, known today as the Letters from a Stoic.  

If you have read Seneca’s work before, carefully study how the Syrus aphorisms have influenced him. 

Regardless of whether they have a Stoic context or not, they are nonetheless enjoyable. 

My favorite aphorisms are in bold.

The quotes are attributable to the D. Lyman translation.

To see other parts of this series, click here.


PUBLILIUS SYRUS #141
Make your beloved angry, if you wish him to love you. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #142
The request of a master is a command. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #143
An agreeable companion on a journey is as good as a carriage. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #144
Society in shipwreck is a comfort to all. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #145
Congeniality of disposition is the strongest of ties. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #146
Consult your conscience, rather than popular opinion. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #147
Consider what you ought to say, and not what you think. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #148
You will gain your point better by moderation than anger. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #149
Many receive advice, few profit by it. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #150
We tolerate without rebuke the vices with which we have grown familiar.

WANT MORE?

We’ve enlisted the help of Marcus Aurelius, Epictetus, and Seneca to assist us in providing even more additional guidance to help you live your most virtuous life. Want to see what wisdom they have to provide? Complete the form below and join our private monthly newsletter. Oh, and did we mention there’s also free goodies for signing up?

THE SAYINGS OF PUBLILIUS SYRUS (Part 14)

This is part 14 in our series of aphorisms by Publilius Syrus who was a big influence on Seneca and his own work. He is quoted by Seneca in two of his letters to Lucilius, On the Value of Advice and On the Philosopher’s Seclusion, both coming from his Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium, known today as the Letters from a Stoic.  

If you have read Seneca’s work before, carefully study how the Syrus aphorisms have influenced him. 

Regardless of whether they have a Stoic context or not, they are nonetheless enjoyable. 

My favorite aphorisms are in bold.

The quotes are attributable to the D. Lyman translation.

To see other parts of this series, click here.


PUBLILIUS SYRUS #131
Trust no man as a friend till you have tried him. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #132
Beware of him who has once deceived you. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #133
You can never dispense with prudence. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #134
The wounds of conscience always leave a scar. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #135
The danger despised is the first to reach us. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #136
Falsities are quick to appear in their true character. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #137
We are anxious to avoid the faults which we are ashamed to have committed. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #138
There is but a step between a proud man’s glory and his disgrace. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #139
The joys of the worthless speedily turn to their destruction. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #140
Oblivion is a guaranty against civil war. 

WANT MORE?

We’ve enlisted the help of Marcus Aurelius, Epictetus, and Seneca to assist us in providing even more additional guidance to help you live your most virtuous life. Want to see what wisdom they have to provide? Complete the form below and join our private monthly newsletter. Oh, and did we mention there’s also free goodies for signing up?

THE SAYINGS OF PUBLILIUS SYRUS (Part 13)

This is part 13 in our series of aphorisms by Publilius Syrus who was a big influence on Seneca and his own work. He is quoted by Seneca in two of his letters to Lucilius, On the Value of Advice and On the Philosopher’s Seclusion, both coming from his Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium, known today as the Letters from a Stoic.  

If you have read Seneca’s work before, carefully study how the Syrus aphorisms have influenced him. 

Regardless of whether they have a Stoic context or not, they are nonetheless enjoyable. 

My favorite aphorisms are in bold.

The quotes are attributable to the D. Lyman translation.

To see other parts of this series, click here.


PUBLILIUS SYRUS #121
The good which is prevented is not annihilated. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #122
The slower to kindle, the more terrible the wrath of a generous soul. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #123
The good man never coquets with iniquity. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #124
Life is short, but its ills make it seem long. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #125
The bare recollection of anger kindles anger. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #126
There is no sight in the eye, when the mind does not gaze. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #127
While teasing for horns, the camel lost his ears. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #128
He keeps furthest from danger who looks out while he is safe. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #129
A chaste wife rules her husband by deferring to his wishes. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #130
Misfortune sometimes visits him whom she has often passed by. 

WANT MORE?

We’ve enlisted the help of Marcus Aurelius, Epictetus, and Seneca to assist us in providing even more additional guidance to help you live your most virtuous life. Want to see what wisdom they have to provide? Complete the form below and join our private monthly newsletter. Oh, and did we mention there’s also free goodies for signing up?

THE SAYINGS OF PUBLILIUS SYRUS (Part 12)

This is part 12 in our series of aphorisms by Publilius Syrus who was a big influence on Seneca and his own work. He is quoted by Seneca in two of his letters to Lucilius, On the Value of Advice and On the Philosopher’s Seclusion, both coming from his Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium, known today as the Letters from a Stoic.  

If you have read Seneca’s work before, carefully study how the Syrus aphorisms have influenced him. 

Regardless of whether they have a Stoic context or not, they are nonetheless enjoyable. 

My favorite aphorisms are in bold.

The quotes are attributable to the D. Lyman translation.

To see other parts of this series, click here.


PUBLILIUS SYRUS #111
The slothful enjoyment of it, is the worst part of prosperity. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #112
Even in death, a good man would not deceive. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #113
To spare the guilty is to injure the innocent. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #114
The more skillfully the language of goodness is assumed, the greater the depravity.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #115
A good man’s severity is next neighbor to justice. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #116
A mean man’s generosity is a generous man’s meanness. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #117
A good man loves to sit at a good man’s table. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #118
In the presence of a good man, anger is speedily cooled. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #119
It is well to moor your bark with two anchors. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #120
Learn to see in another’s calamity the ills which you should avoid. 

WANT MORE?

We’ve enlisted the help of Marcus Aurelius, Epictetus, and Seneca to assist us in providing even more additional guidance to help you live your most virtuous life. Want to see what wisdom they have to provide? Complete the form below and join our private monthly newsletter. Oh, and did we mention there’s also free goodies for signing up?

THE SAYINGS OF PUBLILIUS SYRUS (Part 11)

This is part 11 in our series of aphorisms by Publilius Syrus who was a big influence on Seneca and his own work. He is quoted by Seneca in two of his letters to Lucilius, On the Value of Advice and On the Philosopher’s Seclusion, both coming from his Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium, known today as the Letters from a Stoic.  

If you have read Seneca’s work before, carefully study how the Syrus aphorisms have influenced him. 

Regardless of whether they have a Stoic context or not, they are nonetheless enjoyable. 

My favorite aphorisms are in bold.

The quotes are attributable to the D. Lyman translation.

To see other parts of this series, click here.


PUBLILIUS SYRUS #101
Venus yields to caresses, not to compulsion. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #102
Mercy shown [to the wretched] may become a bulwark of defense. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #103
Happy is the voyage that brings the good together. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #104
A good reputation, even in darkness, keeps on shining. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #105
A death that ends the [incurable] ills of life, is a blessing. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #106
Money is worth something when good sense disburses it. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #107
One man’s happy hour is another’s bitter time of trial. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #108
A good reputation is more valuable than money.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #109
We must master our good fortune, or it will master us. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #110
It is a happy disgrace that saves from a greater peril. 

WANT MORE?

We’ve enlisted the help of Marcus Aurelius, Epictetus, and Seneca to assist us in providing even more additional guidance to help you live your most virtuous life. Want to see what wisdom they have to provide? Complete the form below and join our private monthly newsletter. Oh, and did we mention there’s also free goodies for signing up?

THE SAYINGS OF PUBLILIUS SYRUS (Part 10)

This is part ten in our series of aphorisms by Publilius Syrus who was a big influence on Seneca and his own work. He is quoted by Seneca in two of his letters to Lucilius, On the Value of Advice and On the Philosopher’s Seclusion, both coming from his Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium, known today as the Letters from a Stoic.  

If you have read Seneca’s work before, carefully study how the Syrus aphorisms have influenced him. 

Regardless of whether they have a Stoic context or not, they are nonetheless enjoyable. 

My favorite aphorisms are in bold.

The quotes are attributable to the D. Lyman translation.

To see other parts of this series, click here.


PUBLILIUS SYRUS #91
He who boasts of a favor bestowed, would like it back again.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #92
Sympathy in benevolence is the closest all all kinships. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #93
A true benevolence knows the reason of its gifts.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #94
To die by another’s command is to endure two deaths.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #95
A favor granted before it as asked, is doubly acceptable.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #96
Past happiness augments present wretchedness. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #97
He dies twice who perishes by his own hand.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #98
Aid rendered the wrong-doer, makes you the greater sinner.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #99
Conquest over one’s self, in the hour of victory, is a double triumph. 

PUBLILIUS SYRUS #100
Multiply your acts of kindness, and you teach the recipient to return them. 

WANT MORE?

We’ve enlisted the help of Marcus Aurelius, Epictetus, and Seneca to assist us in providing even more additional guidance to help you live your most virtuous life. Want to see what wisdom they have to provide? Complete the form below and join our private monthly newsletter. Oh, and did we mention there’s also free goodies for signing up?